Dridex


The FortiGuard Labs team continually tracks phishing and spam campaigns around the world. Sending users macro-enabled documents with a malicious payload is one of the most commonly used malware attack vectors for phishing campaigns. This attack vector has been used by used by such prevalent malware families as Dridex, Fareit, and Hancitor. The key to these sorts of campaigns is luring users into clicking on a malicious file attached to an email message. As a result, malware distributors are always looking for ways to trick users into executing their... [Read More]
by RSS Tien Phung Phan  |  Oct 02, 2017  |  Filed in: Security Research
In recent years, with the active efforts of law enforcements to takedown infamous Trojan spywares such as Dridex and GameOver Zeus, one could claim that their status as a predominant threat has died down and given way to ransom malware. But this has not not stopped small groups of individuals from trying to keep this lineage of malware alive. The increasing popularity of Malware-as-a-Service (MaaS) platforms has provided a new way for criminals to keep themselves on the malware profit chain by enticing a wider audience with their malicious... [Read More]
by RSS Joie Salvio  |  Oct 11, 2016  |  Filed in: Security Research
Because of the recent outbreak of the Locky ransomware, Dridex has become synonymous with the distribution of ransomware more generally. However, Dridex is still taking good care of its notorious original business– banking Trojans. While preparing the materials for my upcoming HITBAMS2016 talk on Kernel Exploit hunting and mitigation, I came across this new variant of Dridex (SHA1: 455817A04F9D0A7094038D006518C85BE3892C99), which is rather interesting. The Master of Antivirus Killers Based on some simple string checks, we assumed... [Read More]
by RSS Wayne Chin Yick Low  |  Mar 23, 2016  |  Filed in: Security Research
Modern malware use every possible vector of attack to infect a system. Emails, which are available to almost everyone, are common carriers. In this type of attack, attackers try to lure users to open malicious attachments that look like documents, but have multiple file extensions, such as “financial.doc.exe”. Most of the time, the user only sees the “financial.doc” filename without the ".exe" extension, which makes it easy to assume that it is a Microsoft Word document. Once the file is clicked and executed, the... [Read More]
by RSS Raul Alvarez  |  Apr 29, 2015  |  Filed in: Security Research