Latest Posts | Page 143


We are entering (arguably we have already entered) a digitally bound world where business, service and information flow is bountiful. In parallel, threats have been very active: we have seen a constant increase in malicious code even after a heavy spike in 2007. This increasing trend has carried over into 2009. Most of this increase is simply a flood of variants using packing techniques, server side polymorphism, obfuscation, etc. However, there are always new threats coming out to play. Scareware, ransomware, social networking worms, mobile platform... [Read More]
by RSS Derek Manky  |  Apr 16, 2009  |  Filed in: Security Research
The French Post Office now offers a new online Web service for end-users to print their own stamps, on their own printers.* Although I hate lining up for stamps at the post office, I just wonder if they really have thought it through. The stamps are issued for a 60-day period, and they contain a small 2D barcode on the right proving their authenticity. This code probably contains a signature of the expiration date (of course) and the stamp's value (otherwise a given authenticity code could be re-used on a stamp with a greater value). By the way,... [Read More]
by RSS Axelle Apvrille  |  Apr 13, 2009  |  Filed in: Security Research
Well that would be the usual boring answer from the guy down at the pub who isn't really entering in to the spirit of the conversation. How about this one... Be shot out of a cannon - that's pretty dangerous. But with a little thought we can make it safer. For a start, how big is the cannon? Where is it aiming? Can I wear a crash helmet? Can I land in a very large safety net? Can I get someone else to do it for me? Of course, reading email can be a pretty dangerous business to, with all those requests from your bank, or someone else's bank, to... [Read More]
by RSS Darren Turnbull  |  Apr 07, 2009  |  Filed in: Security Research
In today's context, where the majority of Zombie infections occur via victim's browser exploitation (aka "drive-by install"), a Cyber Guerilla is taking place between malware analysts and Web Exploitation Toolkits developers. The latter used to merely resort to counter-measures (such as dynamic obfuscation or code splitting) in order to hinder the analysis of the malicious javascripts embedded in their exploitation toolkits. But it seems they have now entered a genuinely more aggressive phase, which involves booby-trapping the malicious javascripts... [Read More]
by RSS David Maciejak  |  Apr 02, 2009  |  Filed in: Security Research
Our March 2009 Threat Landscape Report is now available, recapping a month of threat activity from exploits and malware, to spam. Here are some key movements from the report along with comments: After a year long battle, W32/Virut.A finally lands in top spot - surpassing Netsky. This parasitic file infector proves to be quite virulent, and has generated enough activity to land in our malware top 10 for twelve solid months. On top of infecting multiple local files on a PC, the virus can spread through file shares and/or removable media such as USB... [Read More]
by RSS Derek Manky  |  Mar 27, 2009  |  Filed in: Security Research
Over the past two years, rarely did a worm get as much attention that Conficker (aka Downadup) is getting now. Its last variant, the infamous W32/Conficker.C, which surfaced in early March and is set to time-bomb on April 1, is literally all over the media. Of course, its features are well known and documented and some papers (such as SRI's excellent analysis and a blog post from Sourcefire) even give interesting insights on the reverse engineering process. Indeed, while understanding the behavior of the malware is important to most people, learning... [Read More]
by RSS Rex Plantado  |  Mar 26, 2009  |  Filed in: Security Research
The title of this post could be a nickname for the new breed of Internet worms that attack our networks today. Every new big worm or virus finds a more clever way to disseminate faster than his predecessors. But also the payloads are potentially more destructive, innovating on that side too… Does this have a direct relationship with faster computer power on the desktops and bigger bandwidth available? Of course! We are not reinventing the wheel, here. But there is another factor that is sometimes not taken into account: the growing population... [Read More]
by RSS Martin Hoz  |  Mar 19, 2009  |  Filed in: Security Research
Back in 2004, several mass mailing worms spread in unprecedented fashion: MyDoom, Bagle, and Netsky. Netsky had instructions to remove MyDoom and Bagle, leaving this message in one of its variants: "We are the skynet--you can't hide yourself [Read More]
by RSS Derek Manky  |  Mar 16, 2009  |  Filed in: Security Research
I am sure if you have kids you will recognize this issue. Their friends come round, clutching laptops; we live in a modern age. Of course these friends just absolutely need to get online. That WPA2/TKIP solution and MAC filtering you just had to have is causing problems so "click, click, click" it's now WEP128 and you put the SSID and key on the fridge. Now everyone can be online, and they can leave you alone. Sometimes this security stuff can just get in the way of watching a good movie. Let's fast forward: you're an important guy, you're sat... [Read More]
by RSS Darren Turnbull  |  Mar 12, 2009  |  Filed in: Security Research
It looks like we might have the Flocker virus writer's name, age, gender, address, picture, e-mail addresses, IM logins and nicknames. How? Using Google. It all started when we found a nickname in the EPOC executable of the sample. I simply searched for that nickname on Google, and -- coincidence ? -- ran into Indonesian cyberphreaking and mobile phone communities. Digging in that area, it seemed I got really lucky: The person's nickname is the one in the EPOC executable The person''s last name or pseudonym is another word found in the EPOC... [Read More]
by RSS Axelle Apvrille  |  Mar 09, 2009  |  Filed in: Security Research