smartphones


Just a few years ago, the bring-your-own-device (BYOD) to work trend was just starting to give IT administrators cause for concern. Flash forward to today: BYOD has not only reached a tipping point, but is accelerating at a dizzying pace. With this momentum comes elevated fears and a torrent of threats, proven by the latest BYOD and mobility figures from research firm IDC in its Mobile Security Survey 2013. None of these statistics should come as a surprise. Mobile malware is a top concern among the majority (68 percent) of IT-controlled organizations.... [Read More]
by RSS Stefanie Hoffman  |  Jul 30, 2012  |  Filed in: Industry Trends & News
BYOD – Lessons From The Past In a recent survey of people in their 20’s conducted by Fortinet, the majority of respondents stated that bringing their own device (BYOD) to their workplace was a right and not a privilege. http://blog.fortinet.com/study-gen-y-would-break-rules-for-byod/ And nearly a third said that they would contravene a company’s security policy that forbids them to use their personal devices at work or for work purposes. Surely, a client-centric approach to BYOD will face difficulties when so many workers will actively seek... [Read More]
by RSS Kevin Flynn  |  Jul 23, 2012  |  Filed in: Industry Trends & News
On Symbian phones, most malware are either implemented natively in C++ (over the Symbian API) or in Java (midlets). SymbOS/Enoriv.A!tr.dial uses another language called m. Usually, m scripts (.m extension) are run within the m environment, (mShell) using the various features offered by m library modules (messaging, obex, video, zip...). This is comparable to Java midlets, which run over a Java environment and use various Java API packages. The m scripts can also be compiled to be included in a stand-alone Symbian application. In that case, the... [Read More]
by RSS Axelle Apvrille  |  Apr 13, 2010  |  Filed in: Security Research